Saturday, March 2, 2013

Women of Southern Morocco

I'm not quite sure what these wonderful flowing dresses are called.


These photos were taken in Ifni and Tiznet in Southern Morocco.


So far as I could work out, the entire costume is one piece of fabric wound rather elegantly around.


The garment is wonderfully billowy. I really wish I could have asked the women if I could take their photo --but since that wasn't possible, everyone is walking away!


The garment isn't worn exactly like a sari....


..it's more all-enveloping somehow.


Anyway, when I discover how they work, I'll let you know.
My friend Barbara Jamila Fitzgerald answered this question in a comment.
Many thanks Jamila!

See Below
Jamila Fitzgerald said...
When we lived in Tiznit in 1976 these ladies would have been wearing a haik either white on white stripe cotton and wool or black and white stripe all with only one eye showing. I would greet them with the usual assalaamu alaikum and I would hear wa alaikum salaam as I walked down the street.

This garment is a rectangle not as long as a sari and called milhefah. In my son in law's family the women who are lawyers, doctors and teachers wear them.




The little schoolboy could come from almost anywhere.

19 comments:

  1. Wonderful garments, it would be intriguing to know how they work - I would always be a bit nervous of a satorial "fail" I think!

    Helenxx

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  2. Fabulous pictures and amazing colours. We are lead to believe most Muslim women are in black but it's just not the case.

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  3. The cocoon has become the butterfly.

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  4. I love the bright colors and batik!

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  5. I love them and would love to try one, but fear that I would end up face down! I think that there is a knack to wearing them.

    Great photos1

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  6. I'd really like to know how that works too! It must be a very large piece of cloth to wrap so generously around someone like that. I'd like to see where they keep all those colorful lengths of fabric in their homes too - are they folded up like sheets in a cupboard?

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  7. I'm really enjoying your Morrocan posts... the shopping would have my heart racing and an extra suitcase home a requirement!

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  8. Jamila FitzgeraldMarch 2, 2013 at 2:24 PM

    When we lived in Tiznit in 1976 these ladies would have been wearing a haik either white on white stripe cotton and wool or black and white stripe all with only one eye showing. I would greet them with the usual assalaamu alaikum and I would hear wa alaikum salaam as I walked down the street.

    This garment is a rectangle not as long as a sari and called milhefah. In my son in law's family the women who are lawyers, doctors and teachers wear them.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Jamila FitzgeraldMarch 2, 2013 at 2:24 PM

    When we lived in Tiznit in 1976 these ladies would have been wearing a haik either white on white stripe cotton and wool or black and white stripe all with only one eye showing. I would greet them with the usual assalaamu alaikum and I would hear wa alaikum salaam as I walked down the street.

    This garment is a rectangle not as long as a sari and called milhefah. In my son in law's family the women who are lawyers, doctors and teachers wear them.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Elizabeth, I do like these beautiful wrapped layerings of fabulous fabrics. Is there any chance that in visiting a market, you might discover just how many yards/meters are involved...and even buy some?

    I'd think it would be fun to try some of the wrapping, to find out just how to do it with such grace, also allowing for movement.

    Miss seeing you over here. xo

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  11. Very lovely and I'm very jealous - which is very stupid!

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    ReplyDelete
  13. Amazing culture...very different from NYC. I could not be wrapped up like the women...it would be hard to walk.

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  14. What is that rather alarming carcass hanging beside the billowy milhefah?!

    xo

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  15. Really like the milfehahs, particularly the one with the redorange and black big dots!
    They all look so billowy and light,
    like the wind could blow thru them.!

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I look forward to hearing from you!